News

Fifth news item

"You've Got to Sleep With Your Mum and Dad" is now available on Amazon. Childhood angst, marathon swimming, international exploitation and the threat of impending pinniped intimacy. on 2014-08-13
Read more »

Fourth news item

Have a look at my page on Amazon. Still plenty of summer left for challenging literature. on 2014-08-13
Read more »

Third news item

Check out my Amazon Kindle page. 'The Baby Who Killed People for Money' is now available. An utterly charming child with a unique and lucrative skill. A father with no defence against his daughter's impulses. Would you take your little girl around Europe for a spot of murder tourism? Of course you would. on 2014-06-30
Read more »

Second news item

My story on the Tate gallery website on 2013-11-11
Read more »

First news item

A Thousand Natural Shocks An anthology that includes two of my stories. Available now at Amazon. on 2013-11-11
Read more »
June 2016
M T W T F S S
« May   Jul »
 12345
6789101112
13141516171819
20212223242526
27282930  

Archive for June 13th, 2016

Posted June 13, 2016
  Posted by in Uncategorized

Down the hill from Aya Sofya and in the shadow of the restored Sarapdar Hasan Bey Camii are the fragmented remains of a funerary church in the shape of a tetraconch. It must have been a pretty building once but most now lies beneath recent construction.

Aboveground remains of the Tetraconch

Aboveground remains of the Tetraconch

Some of the four-bay structure can be inferred from detail on the remaining brickwork

Some of the four-bay structure can be inferred from detail on the remaining brickwork

Top of arch, hinting at what may remain in case an excavation is ever authorised

Top of arch, hinting at what may remain in case an excavation is ever authorised

This is a plan of the Tetraconch at Labraunda (Henry, 2016). It appears to be similar in plan to the one at Vize.

Henry, Olivier (2016) Tetraconch Bath, Labraunda. IFEA, Istanbul. Available online at: http://www.labraunda.org/Labraunda.org/Tetraconch_bath_eng.html Accessed 13th June 2016

Ötüken, Y. and R. Ousterhout (1989) Notes on the Monuments of Turkish Thrace. Anatolian Studies Vol 39 pp 121 – 149. British Institute at Ankara. Available online at: https://www.academia.edu/4462800/Notes_on_the_Monuments_of_Turkish_Thrace Accessed 7th Feb 2016


Share This Post

Bookmark and Share Bookmark   Print This Post Print This Post    


Posted June 13, 2016
  Posted by in Uncategorized

Vize in the province of Kırklareli is the centre of what was a flourishing district in the time of Justinian. (41.576271, 27.767357) It was already a busy place in Roman times with the foundations of the fortress on the top of the hill dating from about 75BC. There is a nice Roman theatre nearby. There is one large Byzantine church, preserved over the years by conversion into a mosque.

Küçük Aya Sofya / Gazi Süleyman Paşa Camii

Küçük Aya Sofya / Gazi Süleyman Paşa Camii

One ecclesiastical building that was not suited to mosque conversion was the tetraconch, now mostly covered by structures associated with the Sarapdar Hasan Bey Camii.

Tetraconchos of Vize

Tetraconchos of Vize

The area around Vize is dotted with cave buildings, natural shelters inhabited by humans for thousands of years and, in Byzantine times at least, shaed into churches and monasteries. Just north of Vize is Asmakayalar Monastery.

Asmakayalar Monastery

Asmakayalar Monastery

Share This Post

Bookmark and Share Bookmark   Print This Post Print This Post    


Posted June 13, 2016
  Posted by in Uncategorized

Kaynarca may be the world’s friendliest village. I was doing my usual thing of wandering around thinking I could find everything by myself when a local woman realised that I was getting nowhere. She led me to a woman who had just taken some delicious pastries out of the oven. They fed me and took advantage of my inability to speak to tell me about the major points of interest. They also alerted their husbands to give me çay and check any wrong turnings I might make.

Kaynarca is not subject to water restrictions

Kaynarca is not subject to water restrictions

Pure, fresh water gushes from the rocks above Kaynarca and, even in the driest of seasons, sparkles through the village, powering a flour mill on the way. With such an infallible source of water, the place has been settled for thousands of years. When I went to see the spring, the ground was shaking with enormous explosions. I found a soldier in a lookout post who explained to me that the area to the north was a military zone and the percussive earthquakes were tanks doing manoeuvres with live ammunition. I watched from his eyrie and gained a great fear of tanks and what they can do.

Water mill in Kaynarca

Water mill in Kaynarca

As with so many places in the area, natural caves in the rock have lent themselves to conversion to churches with minimal work. Kaynarca’s rock churches are in the south-west-facing cliff face above the flour mill (41.658008, 27.469674). Any walls that once closed the cave off from the elements are long gone, leaving only the parts that have been carved into the rock. The main nave lies along the line of the cliff with the apse at the north-eastern end. A chapel is dug further into the bedrock. A little to the north is one of the küp kayaları common in the area – a sort of storage jar with a round, central hole at the top. It resembles one of the large, earthenware jars used for storing water and keeping it cool in summer.

Main rock church

Main rock church

Northern end of main rock church

Northern end of main rock church

southern end of rock church

southern end of rock church

Chapel inside the main rock church

Chapel inside the main rock church

Top of the storage area beside the rock church

Top of the storage area beside the rock church

The Byzantines also constructed a castle and a decent fortified town. One freestanding church remains (41.657736, 27.471446) near the street that leads south from the main square. This was a typical small cross-in-square late Byzantine church with three apses and a low dome. The southern wall still stands along with the southernmost apse and the lower part of the central, larger, one. Parts of the church can be discerned in the surrounding stone buildings. A column lies beside a farm shed a short distance away. There are the remains of 19th century fresco decoration. The church has undergone the usual 20th century deterioration but not the malicious destruction that went on at Iznik and Enez during and after the War of Independence. The church has been cleaned up a little since the government photographer was there and it is no longer used for farm business.

Intact wall on the south side

Intact wall on the south side

View from south-east showing surviving apse

View from south-east showing surviving apse

Apse interior

Apse interior

Interior of southern side

Interior of southern side

Remnants of fresco decoration

Remnants of fresco decoration

Arch in the south wall

Arch in the south wall

Column in a nearby yard

Column in a nearby yard

Kaynarca also has a lot of lovely houses from the Ottoman era. It is still the sort of place where people till the land with a donkey-powered single-bladed plough.

Kırklareli Kültür Varlıkları Envanteri. Kaynarca Kayalar Kilise. Available online at: http://www.kirklarelienvanteri.gov.tr/anitlar.php?id=156 Accessed 9th June 2016

Kırklareli Kültür Varlıkları Envanteri. Kaynarca Kilise Kalıntası. Available online at: http://www.kirklarelienvanteri.gov.tr/anitlar.php?id=176 Accessed 9th June 2016

Share This Post

Bookmark and Share Bookmark   Print This Post Print This Post    


 
Powered by Wordpress
Website design by Pedalo Limited